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FYI Solutions Blog

May 12, 2015

HR Analytics: Is it Right for Your Organization?

Author:  J.C. Revilla

People analytics is a rapidly evolving area of business intelligence and big data technology used to increase productivity and provide business solutions.  Analytics can be used in any industry, public or private.  It can be a valuable tool, providing unprecedented insights for organizational managers, including human resource managers.

Sophisticated HR Analytics has Arrived

The availability of analytics to address HR is not new.  People analytics has been around for a long time.  What is new is the increasing sophistication brought to the field.  According to Corporate HR Analyst Josh Bersin, “for the first time in the fifteen years I’ve been an analyst, human resource departments are getting serious about analytics.  And I mean serious”.  Bersin states that companies are finally ready to make an investment in applying analytics to people decisions.  More exciting still, “the serious math and data people are flocking to HR”.  (For the complete article, see http://www.forbes.com/sites/joshbersin/2015/02/01/geeks-arrive-in-hr-people-analytics-is-here)

Overcoming Objections to HR Analytics

Now that sophisticated HR analytics has arrived, is it a good fit for your organization?  Although your company may have enough data to make analytics effective, there can still be hurdles to address before HR analytics can be implemented.

According to Tracey Smith, one of the “Top 50 Global Influencers in HR Analytics”, there are five common reasons people are not using HR analytics, all of which can be overcome.  (For the complete article, see http://www.nl.linkedin.com/pulse/5-reasons-get-started-hr-analytics-tracey-smith)  Some of the hurdles are:

  1. Perceived Lack of Quality Data

Organizations are often concerned they do not have quality data.  Smith advises that this should not prevent an organization from using HR analytics because data will rarely, if ever, be perfect.

  1. Lack of Leadership Support

Most HR leaders come from traditional, non-analytical backgrounds.  This can contribute to a low comfort level with analytics in the HR context.  This reluctance can be overcome with concrete examples showing traditional HR professionals what can be achieved through analytics.

  1. Lack of Skill Sets

Organizations are often concerned that they do not have the skills or talent to devote to HR analytics.  Smaller companies, with limited resources and experience in the field, may consider hiring consultants to do the analytics work required.   Consultants can assist organizations in identifying talent, to hire additional staff and to otherwise move forward with HR analytics.

At FYI Solutions, we have helped our clients create data and analytics strategies for 30 years.  We specialize in delivering intuitive, highly integrated Data Management, Reporting, and Analytics solutions.  We are ready to assist your organization in determining how to utilize HR analytics based on your organization’s resources, challenges and needs.

If you would like to determine whether HR analytics is a good fit for your organization, please feel free to contact us at FYI Solutions.

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Apr 29, 2015

New Recruiting Trends gaining momentum in 2015

Author:  Kevin Fitzgerald

With the arrival of the year 2015, we have fully experienced the transition in the talent management/Recruiting world of the “power” or leverage shift from hiring companies to top candidates. Those candidates who possess cutting edge and in demand skills are increasingly seeing multiple offers for their skills and services. This trend is evidenced by the fact that over 83% of Recruiters report that the power has shifted from the employer to the candidate.

To effectively meet the demand of their firms and clients, Recruiters and companies in today’s talent landscape must not rely solely on “old school” methods alone to attract and retain talent.  Listed below are some cutting edge and new industry trends being incorporated by those Recruiting professionals and companies that are attracting and retaining today’s top talent:

1. Mobile technology. Every top candidate has a smartphone.  Firms realize the mobile platform should dominate every aspect of recruiting.  Recruiters who provide communication, video, job descriptions, fill out applications, post resumes, schedule interviews, and perform other administrative tasks via mobile technology will reach more candidates faster and receive a much higher response rate.

2. Recruiters / Firms who can deemphasize resumes and accept online profiles will enable the best candidates to begin the hiring process faster and seamlessly.  Most passive and employed candidates do not have current formal resumes prepared. If a prospect cannot become a candidate and begin the hiring process until a formal resume is completed / submitted, then you can eliminate the “resume update wait period” in the process. LinkedIn profiles can reduce the weakness of traditional resumes put together in haste by candidates who have extensive suitors for their talent.

3. Video currently account for 50% of all mobile traffic. If you/your firm are not using video for job descriptions, employer branding, job postings etc. you are missing an extensive audience. People prefer to view a short video rather than read through text content. It puts your message/brand in the forefront and creates a differentiator.

4. Emloyee referrals will dominate the recruiting landscape. At top firms, 50% of hires will come from quality employee referrals. Building, branding and nurturing a successful employee referral program will not only enable you to identify and attract top talent but will also lead to increased offer acceptance and lower employee turnover. The program must become a part of the corporate culture and not a page in the employee handbook.

5. Clients / Companies must shift to “compelling” job offers. Those that stand out and are different from the competition. Just offering an in-demand candidate “extras” such as a sign on bonus will not be enough. Think about “personalizing” a role for a candidate by providing choices such as core work hours, where they work and possibly which projects they can work on will attract even the most in demand talent in today’s market place.

In closing, most industries/firms are expecting dramatic growth and will be looking to add top talent to fuel that growth. As the world moves faster, the corporate landscape (including the hiring process) must maintain pace. Those that capture and retain top talent will succeed in the years ahead. If you expect to capture cutting edge talent with old school methods alone you can expect marginal results!

So if you are looking for a new opportunity with companies for full time positions in IT or temporary staffing, then reach out to FYI Solutions and let us help you find your next job!

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Apr 14, 2015

Visualize With Tableau What You Can Imagine

Author: Joe Rodriguez

The Wikipedia definition of Imagination says “Imagination helps make knowledge applicable in solving problems and is fundamental to integrating experience and the learning process.” Tableau lets you turn what you imagine into a visualization that you can share with other Tableau users; Tableau Public lets you share your visualizations with the world and to begin, you can download Tableau Public for free at https://public.tableau.com/s/download; you may save and store your visualizations on your Tableau Public profile – Tableau gives you 1GB of space. With Tableau Public you can also embed your published vizzes on a site or blog… they are always live and interactive.

Tableau has a gallery of visualizations that were created by individuals using their imagination and Tableau Public – you can find them here: https://public.tableau.com/s/gallery. The concept of publicly sharing your visualizations can work for many organizations. For example, the NY Daily News published a Housing Project Crime Report viz embedded in the article in this link: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nyc-crime/nycha-residents-live-fear-major-crimes-public-housing-soar-article-1.1747195. Use your imagination to design and create a viz that you may want to share with the general public. And by the way, the next time you hear someone question Tableau’s scalability and performance… refer them to the Tableau Public site where the entire world comprises the stage of Tableau users – we believe they’ll agree Tableau scales extremely well.

After you’ve explored Tableau Public and you want to consider Tableau for your internal organization, you may consider Tableau Desktop for your developers/publishers and Tableau Server for your Tableau users to interact with published vizzes.  Tableau Desktop will allow you to explore your internal data and use your imagination to design/create vizzes that will enable you and your associates to analyze that data, enabling better business decisions. Tableau Online is for the Cloud enthusiasts. FYI Solutions is a Tableau Partner and we can assist you with any of your Tableau needs, including understanding the best Tableau solution approach for your organization. FYI Solutions offers a free 2-week trial of Tableau Desktop that you can download here: http://www.tableau.com/partner-trial?id=30971; and we would be glad to help you achieve your goals utilizing Tableau if you contact us.

When you want to research information on the internet, a common term is to Google it. Likewise when you want to research your data, you will need to Tableau it. We hope you enjoy exploring your data with Tableau. Here is a picture of a visualization:airline-viz

 

 

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Apr 08, 2015

Opening Day, Analytics and Your Business

Author: Brett Zaziski

In honor of this week being the start of the regular season for Major League Baseball I think it’s appropriate that I write a blog about baseball. Much like corporate America, baseball has evolved with the growth of technology. Instant replay is being used, games are now available all across the country at the click of a button and the league is generating record amounts of revenue. The larger market teams have historically dominated the league by signing all the best free agents, paying players the most and essentially buying championships. However, that all changed when the publication of the book Moneyball brought to light the value of sabermetrics. Sabermetrics is known to the business world as analytics. Moneyball is about the 2002 Oakland Athletics who had a total team payroll of $40 million, the third lowest in the league, and yet they still managed to make the playoffs in both 2002 and 2003. You might say, “Yes, but they didn’t win the World Series.” While this is true, my response would be that does not matter. While the fans may not appreciate that answer the truth is that just like FYI Solutions, any Major League team is a business. The Oakland A’s ran the most efficient business and maximized their revenue by spending less and winning more.

This Moneyball approach created a buzz across the league and now all but two teams, the Philadelphia Phillies and Miami Marlins, have data analysts on their payroll. The Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians, Houston Astros, New York Yankees, Oakland A’s, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals and Tampa Bay Rays are considered “all in” and spend the most on analytics in the Major Leagues. All of those teams have made multiple playoff appearances except for the Cubs (*analytics does not negate billy goat curses) and the Astros, both of whom are considered to have a farm system loaded with prospects ready to help make a playoff push in the near future. While analytics seems like the be all end all, it is important to remember that in both business and sports, without the right environment, leaders, managers and chemistry within the organization, all the data in the world might not be enough for a team or a business to succeed.

With the season underway, we will have a larger sample size to see how the teams with the most invested in analytics will perform versus those with lesser analytics payrolls. The team to watch will be the Miami Marlins as they have put together an exciting team without the use of analytics. Recent history has shown that the use of analytics has yielded positive results in terms of playoff appearances. Even if the Miami Marlins do have a successful season, it does not prove that analytics is a hoax rather, it proves that the old methods of scouting are still applicable. Analytics is a tool that should be utilized in all businesses and it should not be viewed as an invaluable or insignificant investment. The use of analytics is not a replacement to old business methods. Rather, analytics should be used to augment them. The point is, here at FYI Solutions, we have a great team that can assist you with your business analytics needs. Underestimating the value and significance of analytics is an old fashioned way of thinking and if you don’t want to make the investment now, you could end up like the present day Phillies in the future.

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Mar 31, 2015

It’s a Scary Word

Author: Sue Bowens

Change.  And I’m not referring to those coins in your pocket.  It’s that word we dread to hear anywhere but most especially at work,  ‘We are having a change in management’, ‘We are changing our process with new software’  or  ‘We are changing our focus and re-allocating the budget to a different project’.  Most of us don’t even like to hear that our department is changing to a different floor.

It’s agreed.  We don’t like change but if you look further, it’s really the uncertainty that comes with change that most people don’t like.  We are creatures of habit and for the most part like knowing what is coming at us each day.  There are good reasons why catchers signal the pitch they want from the pitcher.  No one likes a curve ball when expecting a fast ball.

But what happens when it is a curve ball?

We have options.  We can take a deep breath and accept the change or we can resent it, dig in our heels and make it as difficult as possible. Tamar Chansky  PH.D  suggests that knowing  the three stages of change can ease the transition for us.

Stage 1: Resisting/Reacting:  You’re not looking, you’re judging and it doesn’t look good.

Stage 2: Adjusting/Exploring: You’re gathering information on how to make this work, making choices, making connections, asking questions, digging in.

Stage 3: Living Well in the New Old or the Old New:  You have arrived at your new destination. You’re accepting and incorporating the new so much, you wouldn’t have it any other way: the new is the (new) old.

She also provides advice for handling change. “The way to be gracious (and cut down on your anguish) is not to expect that you’ll have a seamless process, but actually expect the opposite. If you expect discomfort, like slowing down slightly before a familiar bump in the road, it won’t send you flying when you hit it.”

Change, transformation, re-inventing yourself during your career is almost inevitable.  Knowing how to handle change is invaluable.

Now I just hope my editor doesn’t throw me a curve and want me to change this blog.

FYI Solutions can help you through any stage of change. We can provide temporary or permanent staffing placements, make recommendations for appropriate software solutions, or implement highly integrated data management, reporting and analytic solutions.  With 30 years of experience, we know how to get you to stage 3 quickly, easily and have you loving change.  Contact us.

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Mar 26, 2015

Teamwork in the Work Place

By Sam Sodano

Teamwork is “work done by several associates with each doing a part but all subordinating personal prominence to the efficiency of the whole”.  

Teamwork is defined as “those behaviors that facilitate effective team member interaction,” with “team” defined as “a group of two or more individuals who perform some work related task, interact with one another dynamically, have a shared past, have a foreseeable shared future, and share a common fate.” (Wikipedia Definition)

 In the past, I have been accused of using sports as an analogy when speaking or writing of a specific subject. Accusation, Justified!!!

I believe that teamwork is the difference between a good product and a great product. If you follow baseball, the phrase “Tinkers to Evers to Chance” would never have been coined if one of the three infielders from the Chicago Cubs were prone to make an error.

Arguably, the best Wide Receiver and Quarterback in the history of football, Jerry Rice and Joe Montana would never have received that status unless they both were together for all those record setting years.

In the NBA, John Stockton (Assist Leader) and Karl Malone (The Mailman) from the Utah Jazz were so successful because each one consistently knew what to expect from the other.

At FYI Solutions, I believe that the company has prospered and has the longevity that it has primarily due to the cohesiveness and teamwork of the group. There are essentially seven specific groups (Management, Finance, Sales, Recruiting, Solutions, Outreach and Administration) that work together to reach our ultimate goal….Client Satisfaction!!

Without each group doing their specialty, the end result would never happen. The Account Executive receives the Client opportunity and presents it to the Recruiting Staff who searches their respective databases to match the correct candidate to present to the client. Our Account Executives work very closely with our Solutions Staff members to identify Project opportunities to deliver the Client end product.

Without our Administration and Outreach group to support all of the above initiatives, our attrition rate would be so high that we would not be able to sustain any growth. The implementation of our Consultant Outreach program enables FYI and our Consulting staff to work together and keep the lines of communication open to create a better product. The final piece of the puzzle is our Finance group who makes it possible to attain all of the functions by tying the forecasts, revenue, costs and finally payroll together.

Teamwork means so much to our organization that one of our Conference Rooms is named after it.

FYI Solutions is an IT Consultancy, based in NJ, which has been providing staffing, permanent placement services, and solutions to our clients for over 30 years. For more information about FYI Solutions and the available opportunities, contact us.

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Mar 17, 2015

Starting Your First Job After College

Author: Libby Ross

People often say when you graduate from college, you’re ending the current chapter of your life. However, the next chapter of your life doesn’t really start until you move onto something else. For most people, this means starting up a new job.

Beginning your first job is always exciting. Finally, those four years of college are paying off! You’ve survived the stressful interview process, showing the hiring manager you’re perfect for the job while getting a good feel for the company for which you could potentially work.

Like any big change, it takes time to adjust from college life to working life. Some things will catch you off guard, while other things will require you to handle them differently than you did in the past.

Seeing Older Co-Workers as Peers

My parents were pretty laid-back in their parenting, so when they were strict about something, you can be sure I didn’t disobey them. One of the things that they enforced from the time I was little was adults were to be addressed as Mr. or Mrs. — never by their first names. All throughout my childhood, I always addressed my friends’ parents as such, never referring to them by their first names (even if my friends called their parents by their first names). It’s just how it was — I respected the adults in my life, so I wanted to reflect that in the way I addressed them.

So it was a bit of a conflict of interest for me when I started working and had co-workers twice my age introducing themselves by their first names. I shouldn’t have been surprised, but it was the first time I’d ever had an adult recognize me as an equal, rather than a kid.

Legally, you’re an adult the moment you turn eighteen. However, most of us don’t feel like we’re adults until we’re done with college. Once you’re in the workforce, you’re seen as an adult. You can’t go around addressing your co-workers as Mr. Smith or Ms. Johnson. Whether they are in the entry-level with you or are in management, everyone generally goes by his or her first names.

Making Responsible Decisions with Your Paycheck

Getting a paycheck every two weeks is awesome. There’s nothing better than waking up on payday and knowing that your bank account isn’t empty. You can go buy the new clothes you want or get that video game you’ve been dying to play.

Until you remember you have student loans to pay. And then you remember your utility bill is due at the end of the week. And your car has been making a weird noise every time it starts… Being an adult means having adult responsibilities: bills. If you don’t pay your bills, you don’t get electricity or cable.

Budgeting is your most crucial asset in regards to your finances. It’s simple: don’t spend more than you earn. Figure out how much you need each month for essentials, set aside money for savings and then see if you can afford to splurge a little bit.

Dealing with Unpleasant Situations

Things are worth much more in the real world than they are in school. There were some things we all dreaded with class work — group projects, strict deadlines, unreasonable teachers. We’d complain, we’d try to make it work, maybe we’d skip the class for a while and eventually we’d drop the class if it wasn’t worth the effort.

You don’t have that luxury once you start working.

You’ll often have to work in groups in the office for projects. If you don’t carry your weight with your job, you’re not going to get a bad grade — you’re going to get fired. Suddenly, that C- doesn’t look too bad. You might have some coworkers you don’t like. You still have to work with them.

Part of being in the workforce is handling the things you don’t like in a mature, responsible way. As much as we’d love to yell at that person who leaves his leftovers in the fridge for weeks, that’s not the best way to handle the situation and will create more tension further down the road.

Setting into a Routine

In college, life can be a little unpredictable. Your classes change each semester, your evenings are dependent on how much homework or studying you have, and even your weekend plans could change in an instant.

One of the many nice things about having a job is knowing that you have stability in your life. You know exactly where you will be during the workweek. From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., you’ll be in the office. As you get more used to this, you’ll develop a pre-work routine and a post-work routine. For me, I read the newspaper as I eat my breakfast before work, and when I get home I turn on the TV and watch Friends reruns for an hour before making some dinner.

There will always be a little bit of unpredictability with work — you might have to stay late to finish a project or you might head out to a restaurant for happy hour with your coworkers — but generally things aren’t as hectic.

College is supposed to prepare you for the working world. In many ways, it does. However, there are some things that you won’t be ready for until you’re thrown into that position. Once you start your first job, you’ll have a period of time where you’re adjusting to everything — a new sleep cycle, figuring out a morning routine, meeting your new coworkers. You will get past that period. When that happens, then the next chapter of your life can begin.

If you are looking for a new opportunity with companies for full time positions in IT or temporary staffing, then reach out to FYI Solutions and they can help you find your next job!

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Mar 11, 2015

Make An Impression With Your Resume in 6 Seconds

Author: Sean Smallman 

A study conducted by TheLadders, an online job board, found that recruiters spend an average of six seconds reviewing an individual resume. What does this mean for the typical job seeker? It means that it takes more time to type your name on the top of your resume than it does for a recruiter to decide whether or not you’re a fit for a job. This study emphasizes the need to avoid unnecessary or distracting information in your resume. Here are six tips to make every second count.

  • Proofread – Typographical and grammatical errors give the impression of carelessness and inattention to detail. Misspelling keywords, job titles, company names, and technologies are a major red flag and, depending on who’s reading it, may disqualify your resume right away.
  •  Include Specific Dates – Including only years of employment or omitting dates entirely is a common mistake. A resume that excludes specific start and end dates makes it look like you’re covering up a gap in employment. Your best bet is to explain any gaps in employment rather than leaving out information.
  •  Length – Everyone has their own take on the ideal length of a resume. Some say one page, others say three, still others five. In reality there is no maximum page length for a resume. I’ve never heard a recruiter say they loved a candidate’s resume but decided not to pursue them because it was six pages. However, keep it concise. If your resume focuses on the highlights of each position throughout your career then it will be easier for a recruiter to read.
  •  Use Consistent Formatting – The use of consistent formatting throughout your resume is crucial to keeping the reader engaged. Recruiters are looking for company name, location, dates of employment, title, and a summary of your responsibilities for each role. Avoid large blocks of uninterrupted text, fancy designs and fonts, tables, and headers/footers. Keep it simple and minimize clutter.
  •  Replace your Objective with a Summary – “To gain a position with an organization which will allow me to utilize my skills, abilities, and experience to ensure the company’s success.” Objectives like these are usually as boring to read as they are uninformative. Replace the generic objective statement with a brief summary outlining skills, accomplishments, and the specific value you bring to an organization.
  •  Omit Personal Details – Hobbies, photos, references, and personal information (i.e. marital status) on a resume are unnecessary. The statement “References Provided upon Request” is also not needed. Recruiters are already aware that candidates will provide references if requested.

In today’s highly competitive market recruiters are often the gatekeepers between you and your ideal job. Following these tips will help you gain an advantage in your job search by ensuring that recruiters are reading what you want them to read in the short amount of time they have to read it.

FYI solutions has been a leader in IT staffing for over 30 years. Candidates interested in finding out more about our open positions should contact us.

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Mar 05, 2015

Great Tips for Better Interpersonal Communication while Interviewing

Author: Michele D’Aries

When people are looking for a job, they need to be able to communicate the value they can bring to an organization.  Today when looking for a new job there is a lot of  competition in the market place.  Therefore you have to position yourself for the job that you are applying for.  Maybe it’s been awhile since you interviewed for a new job and you need some coaching.  Candidates need to be prepared for interviews so they can beat their competition. Research the company on the web and be able to talk about the company with the interviewer.  Also, give some examples on your accomplishments at your previous employers. This will give the interviewer an idea of your abilities and how you will be able to contribute to their organization.

Below is a recent article by Maren Hogan on February 6, 2015 entitled 4 Tips for Better Interpersonal Communication During Interviews.  This highlights some great tips on how you can improve interviewing techniques.  Read below………..

Tips for better interpersonal communication while interviewing

Interviews are a fact of life in the hiring process, and job seekers need to continue using best practices for interpersonal communication to succeed during interviews. Unfortunately for millennials, this could be tough to do.

American citizens between the ages of 18-29 receive and send roughly 88 text messages per day. The average American also spends approximately 162 minutes buried in their phone each day. The question is, what does this mean for their interpersonal communication skills? Are they slowly dying? Will decaying interpersonal skills lead to failure at interviews?

Are you a millennial (or anyone else, really), with poor communication habits? Then you need to be mindful of these four tips when trying to land a job:

1. Use ‘I’ Statements

Keep “I” statements far away from your resume and cover letters. Why? HR professionals and hiring managers look for candidates who can better their company. Your need to show employers that your skills will benefit them. Display your potential benefits to the company with a confident voice within cover letters and resumes.

Save the “I” statements for the interview — that’s your time to shine. When the interviewer asks questions about projects that qualify you for the position, use “I” statements to exhibit your leadership in these assignments.

Some candidates steer away from this approach because they don’t want to seem boastful to the employer. While “I” statements may make you seem like a braggart in a resume or cover letter, they’re incredibly beneficial to you during the interview. “I” statements — also referred to as power statements — show the employer where your personal strengths lie and how they can benefit the company. Examples of appropriate “I” statements to use during an interview include:

  • “I built a process around new client interactions that increased conversions by 23 percent.”
  • “I changed the way we held internal meetings, reducing each one by 15 minutes.”
  • “I created a tracking spreadsheet that showed inefficiencies in our system and reduced our errors by 5 percent.”

By providing examples of work you have successfully completed and how it transformed the team, department, or company, you give the employer a better understanding of whether or not your skill set can be useful to them. But beware letting your “I” statements take over the conversation: ensure you ask about the company and its plans, goals, and processes as well.

2. Use Action Words

Use words like “changed,” “created,” “developed,” and “organized” to show the employer that you can effect change and take charge at work. This is a more effective way of demonstrating your professional abilities than simply telling the interviewer which abilities you have.

Chances are, the employer is looking to fill a specific skill set. Broad and accurate action words display flexibility and high productivity rates. Power words you may want to think about using in your interview may include:

  • Persistent
  • Decisive
  • Motivated
  • Creative
  • Adaptable

3. Use Quantifiers

Be specific about your past accomplishments. Talk about impactful projects you worked on, big-name organizations you’ve worked with, and any other impressive accomplishments worth mentioning. Doing so will give the hiring manager a clear vision of how you work, the conditions in which you are used to working, and where you set the bar for work projects.

Being vague might seem like a good idea. You may think it makes you seem flexible. However, specificity shows you have done your research on the company and your functional fit. Whenever possible, include a probable number in your answer. Use figures like money saved, turnover decreased, customers served, and/or time saved to quantify the ways in which you can benefit your potential employer.

4. Practice Non-Verbal Communication

If you walk away from an interview knowing more about the knicknacks on the desk than what actually happened in the interview, you weren’t paying attention to the conversation. The interview starts before you sit down with the hiring manager. Upon entrance, be sure to greet other employees in the office with a friendly grin and nod to establish a positive attitude before even meeting the interviewer.

Eye contact is another form of non-verbal communication that exhibits confidence during one-on-one meetings. Maintaining a safe, respectful distance is also important when meeting with an interviewer for the first time. Pauwels Consulting suggests staying no more than three meters from the interviewer. This says you’re neither trying to establish dominance nor get too comfortable too quickly with the potential employer.

So if you are looking for a new opportunity with companies for full time positions in IT or temporary staffing, then reach out to FYI Solutions and let us help you find your next job!

 

 

 

 

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Feb 26, 2015

The Value of a Consultant Outreach Program

Author: Barbara Schiffman

At FYI Solutions, we value our consultants. We know the best practice is to stay in touch with the consultants who are on assignment.  Too often, consultants are placed on assignments, never to hear from their placement firm until the engagement is ending.  It is just as important to manage the relationships with our consultants as it is with our clients. FYI Solutions has a formal program in place, called Consultant Outreach, to ensure that our consultants know they are part of the FYI team.

Once on board, each of our consultants is assigned to a recruiter, and there is a dedicated Account Executive for the client at which they have been placed.  This is common practice with placement providers. We have learned to ensure success for our consultants and our clients to take it one step further.  On a regular basis, usually every 6-8 weeks, a face-to-face meeting is held with each of the consultants. The goals of the Consultant Outreach Program are as follows:

  • Become an advocate for the consultant: By meeting with the consultants on a regular basis, we get to know more about their skills, career interests, etc.  By getting to know what makes them tick, we can align them with new opportunities on a timelier basis and provide opportunities for them to expand their skills.
  • Ensure that the FYI Consultants feel connected to FYI; a consultant will move from one client to another as engagements are completed and new ones begin. The constant is their connection to FYI.
  • Share information about FYI:  Provide information to the consultant so they know what FYI’s near-term and longer-term focuses are.
  • Identify/resolve any questions or issues the consultant may have, before they reach the client. The goal here is client and/or consultant retention. No one likes surprises.  By being in touch with our consultants on a regular basis, we can identify any issues that may be brewing, and take action before they become problems. We will also be aware of positive situations at the client, like commendations from the client that have been announced to their teams.

And finally, our best source of new talent comes from those who we know and respect.    To encourage referrals, FYI has a published Referral Bonus program for staffing as well as permanent placements. This can be found on our website, FYISolutions.com.

FYI is fully aware that our consultants are an integral part of the FYI team and the most critical aspect of our success.  The Consultant Outreach program enables FYI to demonstrate that on a regular basis to our consultants.

FYI is an IT Consultancy, based in NJ, which has been providing staffing, permanent placement services, and solutions to our clients for over 30 years.  For more information about FYI Solutions and the available opportunities, contact us.

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